Spaced Out
guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

guyrim:

dezeen:

The “first man-made biological leaf” could enable humans to colonise space»

if you aren’t hyped about synthetic life and colonizing space then get out of my face

At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely face of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare.
Caitlin Moran (via artvevo)
into-theuniverse:

SN 1006 Supernova Remnant

into-theuniverse:

SN 1006 Supernova Remnant

hydrogeneportfolio:

"Maybe we’re on Mars because of the magnificent science that can be done there - the gates of the wonder world are opening in our time. Maybe we’re on Mars because we have to be, because there’s a deep nomadic impulse built into us by the evolutionary process, we come after all, from hunter gatherers, and for 99.9% of our tenure on Earth we’ve been wanderers. And, the next place to wander to, is Mars. But whatever the reason you’re on Mars is, I’m glad you’re there. And I wish I was with you.”
— Carl Sagan

hydrogeneportfolio:

"Maybe we’re on Mars because of the magnificent science that can be done there - the gates of the wonder world are opening in our time. Maybe we’re on Mars because we have to be, because there’s a deep nomadic impulse built into us by the evolutionary process, we come after all, from hunter gatherers, and for 99.9% of our tenure on Earth we’ve been wanderers. And, the next place to wander to, is Mars. But whatever the reason you’re on Mars is, I’m glad you’re there. And I wish I was with you.

 Carl Sagan

micdotcom:

The crisis in Gaza is so serious, it can be seen from space

International Space Station astronaut Alexander Gerst has posted his “saddest photo yet.” From all the way up in the thermosphere, ISS personnel orbiting 200 miles over the Middle East can see bombs and missiles exploding in Gaza and Israel as the two sides go to war.

Detailed explanation of the photo | Follow micdotcom 

nprglobalhealth:

This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World’s Most Amazing Teen
At age 7, Gideon Gidori knew exactly what he wanted to be: a rocket ship pilot.
The only thing was, he was living in a tiny Tanzanian village where schools only went through grade six and books about space (or for that matter, any books) were scarce.
But that didn’t stop him. Now 15, Gidori is determined to become Tanzania’s very first astronaut.
Gidori has always been fascinated with stars and spent his boyhood nights staring at the clear skies above his hometown. “I think there is much more up there than there is down here, and I want to know what that is,” he says. When he becomes an astronaut, he hopes his first stop will be the moon – one of Jupiter’s moons, that is.
"They say that on Europa, there’s life," he says. "I want to be part of the crew that investigates it."
With the help of Epic Change, his dream isn’t just wishful thinking. The nonprofit, which raises money for education and technology, gave him a scholarship to study in the U.S. This May, Gidori completed his first year of flight training school at Florida Air Academy.
To finance his next school year, he’s using the allure of potato salad. Tanzanian astronaut potato salad, to be exact.
Inspired by the entrepreneur who raised more than $60,000 to make potato salad on Kickstarter, Gidori and his host family — Epic Change cofounders Sanjay Patel and Stacey Monk – are using the online platform to raise $35,000 to cover tuition and fees for next year. On their Kickstarter page, the trio has promised to throw the “greatest potato salad party in Tanzanian history” the day Gidori lifts off into space for the first time.
And the Tanzanian teen means it; he already has an experimental recipe in the works. As of July 22, a little more than $12,000 has been raised on Kickstarter and Rally.org.
Continue reading.
Photo: It took 101 takes to get the right shot for Gideon Gidori’s Kickstarter video. He hopes supporters will fund his flight school tuition in exchange for a secret potato salad recipe. (via Kickstarter)

nprglobalhealth:

This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World’s Most Amazing Teen

At age 7, Gideon Gidori knew exactly what he wanted to be: a rocket ship pilot.

The only thing was, he was living in a tiny Tanzanian village where schools only went through grade six and books about space (or for that matter, any books) were scarce.

But that didn’t stop him. Now 15, Gidori is determined to become Tanzania’s very first astronaut.

Gidori has always been fascinated with stars and spent his boyhood nights staring at the clear skies above his hometown. “I think there is much more up there than there is down here, and I want to know what that is,” he says. When he becomes an astronaut, he hopes his first stop will be the moon – one of Jupiter’s moons, that is.

"They say that on Europa, there’s life," he says. "I want to be part of the crew that investigates it."

With the help of Epic Change, his dream isn’t just wishful thinking. The nonprofit, which raises money for education and technology, gave him a scholarship to study in the U.S. This May, Gidori completed his first year of flight training school at Florida Air Academy.

To finance his next school year, he’s using the allure of potato salad. Tanzanian astronaut potato salad, to be exact.

Inspired by the entrepreneur who raised more than $60,000 to make potato salad on Kickstarter, Gidori and his host family — Epic Change cofounders Sanjay Patel and Stacey Monk – are using the online platform to raise $35,000 to cover tuition and fees for next year. On their Kickstarter page, the trio has promised to throw the “greatest potato salad party in Tanzanian history” the day Gidori lifts off into space for the first time.

And the Tanzanian teen means it; he already has an experimental recipe in the works. As of July 22, a little more than $12,000 has been raised on Kickstarter and Rally.org.

Continue reading.

Photo: It took 101 takes to get the right shot for Gideon Gidori’s Kickstarter video. He hopes supporters will fund his flight school tuition in exchange for a secret potato salad recipe. (via Kickstarter)

colchrishadfield:

Listen to the sound of interstellar space. Voyager recorded vibrations in ionized gas. Odd that it’s rising.

commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

canadian-space-agency:

45 years ago today, on July 16 1969, NASA Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins launched to the Moon aboard Apollo 11 for an historical adventure that would change mankind forever!

Credit: NASA

canadian-space-agency:

45 years ago today, on July 16 1969, NASA Astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins launched to the Moon aboard Apollo 11 for an historical adventure that would change mankind forever!

Credit: NASA